CENTER FOR REMOTE SENSING OF ICE SHEETS: -----------

Our mission is to understand and predict the role of polar ice sheets in sea level change.

Changes in the mass of large ice sheets can also cause small local variations in gravity.

"By combining GOCE’s high-resolution measurements with information from Grace, scientists can now look at changes in ice mass in small glacial systems – offering even greater insight into the dynamics of Antarctica’s different basins. 

They have found that the loss of ice from West Antarctica between 2009 and 2012 caused a dip in the gravity field over the region.”

Click Here to read the full story from GOCE.

CReSIS builds detailed maps of Greenland’s Jakobshavn Glacier

"Imaging rock beneath glaciers like Jakobshavn is important, but more difficult than mapping the ice sheet interior. The relatively warm ice and rough surfaces of outlet glaciers weaken and scatter radar signals, making the bed difficult to detect. To overcome these challenges, CReSIS used a sensitive radar instrument with a large antenna array and used several processing techniques to remove interference and build a view of sub-ice bedrock. “We showed that we have the technology to map beds,” said [Prasad] Gogineni. [Director of CReSIS]"

To learn more and for the complete the story, visit NASA’s article  

.

Ancient Records Reveal Scary Sea-Level Scenarios

Sediment cores from below the Red Sea bolster two key tenets of climate experts, scientists reported Thursday: A three-foot sea level rise in a century is by no means extreme, and once ice sheets start to melt, that process is likely to accelerate for several centuries.
Using 500,000-year-old sediment cores, scientists from Australian National University reported that data covering more than 120 episodes of sea level change support those predictions of what Earth’s near future might hold.







“We can quantify how fast sea level rose in the past, in response to natural climate processes,” study co-author Katharine Grant, a climate researcher at the Australian National University, told NBCNews.com.
Read more:

Ancient Records Reveal Scary Sea-Level Scenarios

Sediment cores from below the Red Sea bolster two key tenets of climate experts, scientists reported Thursday: A three-foot sea level rise in a century is by no means extreme, and once ice sheets start to melt, that process is likely to accelerate for several centuries.

Using 500,000-year-old sediment cores, scientists from Australian National University reported that data covering more than 120 episodes of sea level change support those predictions of what Earth’s near future might hold.

“We can quantify how fast sea level rose in the past, in response to natural climate processes,” study co-author Katharine Grant, a climate researcher at the Australian National University, told NBCNews.com.

Read more: