CENTER FOR REMOTE SENSING OF ICE SHEETS: -----------

Our mission is to understand and predict the role of polar ice sheets in sea level change.
Arctic sea ice has thinned over the past few decades

Over the past few decades, Arctic sea ice has been retreating, and although research shows a downward trend in snow on land in the Arctic, long-term measurements of snow depth on sea ice have been less clear. But now, new research using data from NASA’s Operation IceBridge shows that snow depth on Arctic sea ice has been decreasing over the past several decades, a trend largely owing to later sea ice freeze-up dates in the Arctic.
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Arctic sea ice has thinned over the past few decades

Over the past few decades, Arctic sea ice has been retreating, and although research shows a downward trend in snow on land in the Arctic, long-term measurements of snow depth on sea ice have been less clear. But now, new research using data from NASA’s Operation IceBridge shows that snow depth on Arctic sea ice has been decreasing over the past several decades, a trend largely owing to later sea ice freeze-up dates in the Arctic.

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Scientists had never measured waves in the Beaufort Sea, an area north of Alaska, until recently. 

Sixteen-foot waves are buffeting an area of the Arctic Ocean that until recently was permanently covered in sea ice—another sign of a warming climate, scientists say.
Because wave action breaks up sea ice, allowing more sunlight to warm the ocean, it can trigger a cycle that leads to even less ice, more wind, and higher waves. (See ”Shrinking Arctic Ice Prompts Drastic Change in National Geographic Atlas.”)
Scientists had never measured waves in the Beaufort Sea, an area north of Alaska, until recently. Permanent sea ice cover prevented their formation. But much of the region is now ice-free by September, and researchers were able to anchor a sensor to measure wave heights in the central Beaufort Sea in 2012.
"It is possible that the increased wave activity will be the feedback mechanism which drives the Arctic system toward an ice-free summer," write Jim Thomson of the University of Washington in Seattle and Erick Rogers with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Mississippi in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.
Read more:

Scientists had never measured waves in the Beaufort Sea, an area north of Alaska, until recently. 

Sixteen-foot waves are buffeting an area of the Arctic Ocean that until recently was permanently covered in sea ice—another sign of a warming climate, scientists say.

Because wave action breaks up sea ice, allowing more sunlight to warm the ocean, it can trigger a cycle that leads to even less ice, more wind, and higher waves. (See ”Shrinking Arctic Ice Prompts Drastic Change in National Geographic Atlas.”)

Scientists had never measured waves in the Beaufort Sea, an area north of Alaska, until recently. Permanent sea ice cover prevented their formation. But much of the region is now ice-free by September, and researchers were able to anchor a sensor to measure wave heights in the central Beaufort Sea in 2012.

"It is possible that the increased wave activity will be the feedback mechanism which drives the Arctic system toward an ice-free summer," write Jim Thomson of the University of Washington in Seattle and Erick Rogers with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Mississippi in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

Read more: